personal-profiles

4 Ways to Tackle High Turnover

Every organization wants a productive team. But when flawed hiring processes lead to the wrong people being hired, high turnover follows—and it comes at a high cost.

A study by the Center for American Progress reports that the median costs of replacing an employee are estimated at more than 21 percent of the employee’s annual salary. Some estimates go even further, suggesting the cost can be as high as 400 percent of the employee’s salary, depending upon the employee’s position and level.

With so much at stake, hiring the wrong people is a mistake you can’t afford to make.

Lay a foundation of trust 

The goal of every organization should be to retain every high-performing employee. High performers who leave too soon will force you to start over, and this constant churn can feel like being on a hamster wheel.

While it’s challenging for busy managers to make time to engage with teams and build good rapport, it’s essential for resolving turnover issues.

Here are four strategies your business can implement to minimize turnover and focus on investing in dedicated, talented people.

1. Tap your best people for the hiring process. Most leaders don’t know how to improve their recruiting efforts. When interviewing candidates, include the people who know the job—unlike managers who want to fill a hole, these people will assess whether they want to work alongside the candidates. Team members who will work with the new employee can be trained to use behavior-based interview questions that probe not only for experience, but also for character and attributes. Those who know the job inside out are the most capable of identifying the best candidates.

2. Provide new hires with the information they need to succeed. How an employer handles the initial weeks and months of a new employee’s experience is critical: Studies show that the first 90 days of employment are key as new employees establish relationships with management and colleagues. New hires should be brought on using a strategic and engaging onboarding process that introduces the company’s policies and procedures for getting things done, as well as its culture. Unfortunately, companies often confuse onboarding with training. An effective two-way onboarding process significantly affects employee retention by ensuring people are brought up to speed on the job skills and internal knowledge they need to be productive.

3. Maximize the manager’s role. If you’re experiencing high turnover, the root cause is most likely bad leadership, according to Gallup research. At HPWP Consulting, we frequently see leaders functioning below their pay grade, overwhelmed by the demands of daily operations and unavailable to develop and coach their teams. Additionally, weak leaders don’t address employees doing the bare minimum; this not only impacts productivity, but it also affects the morale of good performers, who end up doing more. A good employee won’t put up with a bad leader for too long.

4. Focus on retention strategies. Stay interviews are 20 or 30-minute discussions—between managers and direct reports, ideally—that offer a tangible way for leaders to show they care about employees and value their contributions. In addition to alerting leaders of people with significant concerns (an early warning of quitting), stay interviews offer intervention opportunities before high performers become turnover statistics. After discovering what employees appreciate about a company’s processes, culture, and leadership, these areas should be strengthened, celebrated, and reinforced by leaders.

Value performance over statistics

Jack Welch, former General Electric CEO, is widely quoted saying that the bottom 10 percent of his organization needed to be replaced every year.

Some have concluded that 10 percent is the “golden turnover number” that every organization should aim for, and a recent article about Amazon’s culture called this type of annual culling “purposeful Darwinism.”

HPWP doesn’t believe in a “survival of the fittest” model of management. When a company strives for 100 percent performance, magic numbers become irrelevant.

Rather than worry about the “golden turnover number,” companies should encourage, support, and develop employees. High performers will stick around only if they feel valued and can trust their managers. There may not be a hard number attached, but this formula is proven to reduce turnover and increase innovation.

Photo credit: Lauren Kallen

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8 Simple Ways to Improve Your Business Writing

Writing is one of the most important ways you communicate with your clients and audience. For entrepreneurs, that means conveying your brand through your website, on email and through social media. Looking to improve your writing skills? Here are nine tools that will help you get your writing to the next level.

1. Know your target audience. Who are you writing for—customers, clients, or staff? Depending on who your audience is, you will want to tailor your language, approach, and tone. For example, if you’re writing for the public, you’ll want to go out of your way to introduce key concepts. 8 Must Read Books That Will Improve Your Business Writing Skills is a great resource for more tips.

2. Be conversational. When writing for potential customers don’t focus on selling to them outright, and avoid any technical jargon they may not understand. Aim for a more conversational tone, and let the customer know how your product benefits them.

3. Don’t rely on hyperbole. It’s tempting to gush about your product, after all, you’re the one who made it. But exaggerating isn’t going to help. Instead of saying something like “we’re the best,” use facts and statistics to convey your point. You can also use testimonials from previous customers.

4. Avoid jargon when possible. Try to avoid buzzwords and business jargon, especially when you write for those outside of your industry. “It can be alienating and can even cost you sales in the long run,” says Naomi P. Wingfield, head writer of Assignment Writing Service, a Sydney-based writing center which offers copywriting and editing services. Write My Paper, or a proofreading tool such as ProofreadBot, can help weed them out.

5. Get to the point and keep it simple. More doesn’t always mean better content. When you’re writing, get to the point quickly. When writing online, stick to around 500 words for an article. Use the active voice, write to inform and avoid flowery language. Prioritize words that best convey your point over more complicated sentence construction

6. Always proofread. No matter how well you write, the odd typo or spelling mistake can slip through. Proofread everything and always use spell check, even in your inter-office emails. If you need help, try Word Counter to highlight spelling mistakes, or Do My Assignment to help you catch grammatical errors.

7. Save templates. If you’ve sent a communication that you feel was one of your best, you can save it. It’s worth keeping a file of templates, as they can help you save time when you need to write something similar for a future client. For example, maybe you’ve written an email campaign for your customers that you felt went really well. Save the template, then you can reword it when it’s time to create the next one, saving a lot of time. You can also use outside services, such as Academized, when you need to write particularly important emails.

8. Don’t forget the call to action. Most content aims to engage the reader. One of the best ways to get a response, or start a conversation, is with a short call to action at the end of a piece of content.

 

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At Creator Awards, Women Entrepreneurs Take Home Top Prizes

Photographers had just finished snapping a few final shots when Elizabeth Lindsey’s phone rang. She quickly ducked over to one side of the room.

“I couldn’t wait to tell somebody the news,” she said to the person on the other end. “You’re not going to believe it.”

Lindsey, the executive director of Byte Back, said a few minutes later that she still couldn’t believe it herself. She had just won the top prize at the kickoff event for Creator Awards. That meant $360,000 for her innovative organization, which provides computer training and career preparation for underserved residents of the Washington, D.C. area.

“This award will help us transform the work we do,” Lindsey said, smiling broadly. “We’ll be able to expand our training so that we can reach more adults and help them move into careers where they earn a living wage.”

Lindsey was one of 25 winners at the Creator Awards, held Tuesday night at D.C.’s Mellon Auditorium. WeWork gave out the prizes, which totaled more than $1.5 million.

The top three prizes, totaling $720,000, all went to organizations run by women. More than half of all the winning companies were founded or cofounded by women.

Kellee James of Mercaris, Elizabeth Lindsey of Byte Back, and Cristi Hegranes of Global Press Institute took home the top prizes at the Creator Awards.
Kellee James of Mercaris, Elizabeth Lindsey of Byte Back, and Cristi Hegranes of Global Press Institute took home the top prizes at the Creator Awards.

Adam Neumann, cofounder of WeWork, told the hundreds of people who gathered for the event that he intended the awards to help fund the types of entrepreneurs that aren’t usually recognized.

“Chase your passion, chase your truth, and everything else will work out,” he said to the crowd.

Over the course of a year, WeWork will be giving out more than $20 million at a series of events in cities spanning the globe. Subsequent Creator Awards events will take place in North America, Europe, and the Middle East. The next one is scheduled for Detroit on May 25.

Winners from each event will come together for the global finals, which will be held in New York City on November 30.

There were three categories of Creator Awards, including the Incubate Award for great ideas or specific projects that need funding, and the Launch Award for young businesses and organizations that need a little help getting off the ground. The third, the Scale Award, is for more established operations aiming to get to the next level.

In addition to Lindsey, other Scale Award winners were Kellee James of Mercaris, which works with organic and non-GMO agriculture, and Cristi Hegranes of Global Press Institute, which trains and employs female journalists from around the world.

Hegranes said she’s proud of the dozens of women who’ve become journalists through her organization’s programs.

“I employ 100 women around the world, and that’s what keeps me going day and night,” she said.

The winners of the Launch Awards included Quaker City Coffee, Together We Bake, Global Vision 2020, and Coral Vita.

Winning the top prize in the Launch Awards was MemoryWell, which tells the life stories of people with Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia.

“I started off by writing the story of my father, who had Alzheimer’s,” said Jay Newton-Small, the journalist who cofounded the organization. “And when we realized that knowing his story helped his caregivers, we knew this was something that would help others as well.”

There were 17 winners in the Incubate category, including Milinda Balthrop of Filmmakers for Tomorrow Foundation, Cindy Frei of Caleb’s Cooking Company, Debra Brown of Child Care Counts, Ben Melman of Booksmart Touring, Nick Delmonico of Strados, Chibueze Ihenacho of ARMR Systems, Angelina Klouthis of the Vicente Ferrer Foundation, Jes Christian of Hypsole, Charlene Brown of Reciprocare, CJ Cross of GoCraft Brewing, Ian Rinehart of Conserve With Us, Robert Fine of Cool Blue Media, Akwasi Asante of Phoenix Aid, Audrey Henson of College to Congress, Jelena S. Mishina of Shared Workshop, Karima Ladhani of Barakat Bundle, and Katie Thompson of Causeumentary.

Photos by Lauren Kallen

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personal-profiles

A Lifelong Love of Tech Inspires Saeed Jabbar to Teach Young People to Code

Growing up in Guyana, the only thing Inclusion founder Saeed Jabbar wanted as a kid was his own video game console. But that luxury was out of reach for his family, until they moved to Jamaica, Queens when he was about 10 years old.

“Every kid is interested in video games, right?” he asks. “But I wanted to do more than just play around. I wanted to build my own. But it wasn’t that easy. I mean, the internet wasn’t where it is today. You couldn’t just Google about how to build a video game.”

Soon after he moved to the U.S., he taught himself enough code to create his first game. It was the start of a lifelong love affair with technology.

“By the time I was 13, somebody told me I could make money building websites for people,” he says. “And the rest is history.”

WeWork CreatorJabbar was bullied as a teenager, so when he was 16, he transferred to a high school across the East River in Manhattan. It wasn’t far away on the map, but it seemed like a different planet.

He began to immerse himself in a world he didn’t know existed: New York’s bustling startup culture.

“I never went to class, really,” he admits. “I spent my last two years dabbling with startups and learning the ropes at tech companies.”

Jabbar realized how valuable his experience could be for all the kids back in Queens.

Saeed Jabbar Inclusion 3“The people in my community don’t even know opportunities like this exist,” he says. “I knew if they could learn how to code, it could completely transform their lives.”

That’s when he came up with the idea for Inclusion, a nonprofit that he hopes will help close “the digital divide.”

And Jabbar envisioned teaching more than just coding. His classes would include important business tools like Microsoft Office. He says when it comes to analyzing data, he always teaches Excel.

“This is something that we consider essential for our students,” Jabbar says. “There’s no better way to train for data analytics.”

Jabbar launched his company at the end of 2015. It was an immediate success. At the beginning of 2016, Inclusion partnered with the State University of New York to offer classes in coding.

“We expected it to appeal to young people,” he says, “but the students ranged in age from 20 all the way up to 66.”

And the nonprofit has already attracted the attention of prominent investors.

“We started out with zero budget, just a classroom and a few computers,” Jabbar says. “But seeing the transformation of the people we’ve taught made it worth it. We’ve proven that you can make a difference.”

Photos by Katelyn Perry

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In the Home Stretch, Creator Award Finalists Perfect Their Pitch

After leading her nonprofit for a decade, Cristi Hegranes had perfected her pitch. She knew just how to describe her organization’s work to the boards of some of the world’s most prominent foundations.

Then she was notified that Global Press Institute was a finalist for the Creator Awards, and she threw her usual pitch out the window.

“We’re trying out some new language, new description, new slides—basically everything,” says the member at WeWork Manhattan Laundry. “This is not the typical foundation types we’re used to pitching to. It’s exciting, and a little bit nerve-wracking.”

Hegranes says the Creator Awards, launched by WeWork to “recognize and reward the creators of the world,” are different because she won’t be pitching to a roomful of people in business suits.

“This will be more like talking with peers,” she says, “people who understand how difficult it is to raise the funding to take your organization to the next level.”

Shaun Masavage, co-founder of Edge Tech Labs, plans to show off his Fret Zeppelin product by "teaching one of the judges guitar in 60 seconds.”
Shaun Masavage, co-founder of Edge Tech Labs, plans to show off his Fret Zeppelin product by “teaching one of the judges guitar in 60 seconds.”

Over the course of a year, WeWork will be giving out more than $20 million at a series of events taking place in cities spanning the globe. The first Creator Awards competition will take place Tuesday at Andrew W. Mellon Auditorium in Washington. D.C.

Subsequent Creator Awards events will take place in North America, Europe, and the Middle East. Winners from each event will come together for the global finals, to be held in New York City on November 30.

Creator Awards finalist Shaun Masavage, co-founder of Edge Tech Labs, is also avoiding the usual type of pitch. His plan for introducing Fret Zeppelin, an eye-catching device that uses LED lights to help you learn guitar, is pretty unusual.

I think our pitch is going to be pretty good,” says the WeWork Crystal City member. “We’ll try to get one of the judges to come up on stage and teach them guitar in 60 seconds.”

And finalist Thomas Doochin, one of the founders of Daymaker, says he hasn’t even had time to think about his pitch. His company, which helps kids give to others who are less fortunate, was going to relaunch his company on Wednesday with a completely new name, website, and branding.

Arion Long of Femly says she’s excited to share her idea of sending chemical-free products designed to keep women healthier and happier straight to their door.
Arion Long of Femly says she’s excited to share her idea of sending chemical-free products designed to keep women healthier and happier straight to their door.

“First we heard that we were finalists in the Creator Awards,” says the member at WeWork Dupont Circle. “But the event was on Tuesday, the day before our relaunch. So I told the team we had to get everything ready a day early.”

They worked through this past weekend to get the new website up and running by the time Doochin steps on the stage at Mellon Auditorium.

There are three categories of Creator Awards, including the Incubate Award for great ideas or specific projects that need funding, and the Launch Award for young businesses and organizations that need a little help getting off the ground. Arion Long is competing for the Scale Award, which is for more established operations aiming to get to the next level.

Long, founder of a monthly subscription box for feminine health products called Femly Box, says she was visiting family in North Carolina when she heard about the competition. She shot her 90-second video after everyone went to bed.

“I made it at about 2 in the morning,” Long says, laughing. “I was standing in front of a curtain. I had to do several takes, because someone was coughing in the background.”

Santos Jaime Gonzalez says that when he told the staff at Manestream that they were finalists for the Creator Awards, "everyone was jumping around, going crazy.”
Santos Jaime Gonzalez says that when he told the staff at ManeStreem that they were finalists for the Creator Awards, “everyone was jumping around, going crazy.”

Long, who had a cervical tumor when she was 26, says she’s excited to share her idea of sending chemical-free products designed to keep women healthier and happier straight to their door.

Santos Jaime Gonzalez, cofounder of an on-demand beauty and makeup service called ManeStreem, says he was “humbled” when he found out that he was a finalist.

“Normally when I get exciting news I send it to the team right away,” says Gonzales, a member at Philadelphia’s WeWork 1900 Market. “I got an email at about 5 in the afternoon, but I needed some time by myself to process the news. At 6 the next morning, I finally sent it out to the team. Of course everyone was jumping around, going crazy.”

What will Gonzalez do if he wins a Creator Award? He says the money will help his company scale quickly, increasing the number of beauty consultants to about 100,000 over the next 12 months.

“We’ve disrupted the beauty industry by making it on demand,” he says. “Now the true disruption happens.”

Darius Baxter is a cofounder of the nonprofit GOOD Projects, which pairs young people from disadvantaged neighborhoods with inspirational mentors. The organization currently works with teenagers who’ve gone through the criminal justice system. He wants to help others as well.

“We don’t want to wait for kids to be locked up to provide them with services,” says Baxter. “This would go a long way in helping us achieve that goal.”

And Kevin White, executive director of Global Vision 2020, says winning would allow him to start a pilot program to provide eyeglasses to high school students in Mozambique.

“Injection molds are expensive, but winning the Creator Awards would mean that we could purchase them and immediately start producing eyeglasses,” says White. “Imagine providing glasses to all the students in an entire country. It would be amazing.”

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